Young Poets Network “Melting Ice” Contest

Young Poets NetworkMelting Ice” Poetry Contest

Young Poets Network has teamed up with the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, to present you with a challenge to write about the changing face of the Polar Regions.
  • Open to poets aged 25 and under, from all over the world.
  • You can send a page poem written down, or a performance poem as a video or as an audio file.
  • Send as many poems as you like.
  • If you are sending a written version of your poem, please include it in the body of an email.
  • If you are sending a video or audio file, please attach it to the email (making sure it’s no bigger than 4MB or it won’t come through) or send us a link to where we can see/hear it.
  • Send your poems to educationadmin@poetrysociety.org.ukwith your name, age & address.
  • By entering, you give permission for Young Poets Network and The Maritime Museum to reproduce your poem in print and online, though copyright remains with you.
  • The deadline is Sunday 30 June 2017 (U.K. time).

Continue reading “Young Poets Network “Melting Ice” Contest”

Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction

Marguerite McGlinn Prize for FictionPrize: $2,000
Entry Fee: $15
Deadline: 6/15/17
Genre: Fiction

Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction

The Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction is an annual national short fiction contest that features a first place $2,000 cash award and invitation to an awards dinner on the campus of Rosemont College; a second place cash prize of $500; and third place cash prize of $250. The winner stories will be published in the print issue of Fall of Philadelphia Stories. The Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction is made possible by the generous support of the McGlinn and Hansma families.

Contest Submission Guidelines:

  • Deadline: January 1 – June 15, 2017.
  • Previously unpublished works of fiction up to 8,000 words. Please note, “published” includes any work published in print or online, including online magazines, blogs, public social media sites, etc.
  • Multiple submissions will be accepted for the contest only. Simultaneous submissions are also accepted, however, we must be notified immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Only authors currently residing in the United States are eligible.
  • Submissions will only be accepted via the website. Please email contest@philadelphiastories.org if you are having any trouble with your submission.
  • There is a $15 reading fee for each story submitted.
  • All entrants will receive a complimentary copy of the Philadelphia Stories contest issue.
  • Winners will be announced by October 1, 2017.

Submit Your Story Continue reading “Marguerite McGlinn Prize for Fiction”

Cultural Center of Cape Cod Poetry Competition

Cultural Center of Cape CodPrize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $15
Deadline: 6/19/17
Genre: Poetry
Website: http://www.cultural-center.org/

11th Annual National & Regional Poetry Competition

The Cultural Center of Cape Cod will award a National Prize of $1000  for a single, unpublished poem that has not won 1st prize in any national competition. Open to all U.S. residents 18 years & older. A Regional Prize of $250 will be awarded for a single, unpublished poem (that has not won 1st prize in any national competition) by an adult resident of Cape Cod, Nantucket, or Martha’s Vineyard. All Cape and Islands poets are also eligible for the National Award. A committee will judge.

General Guidelines

Submit up to three poems of any style or subject totaling no more than five pages with an entry fee of $15 by June 19, 2017 (postmark).

All entries should be typewritten on plain, white paper. The poet’s name should not appear on any page except the cover page, which should include name, address, phone number, and email address, the titles of the poems submitted, and a brief bio.

Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but please notify immediately if submissions are accepted for publication elsewhere.

Manuscripts will not be returned.

Winners will be notified and their names posted on the Cultural Center’s web site by September 2017. No other notification will be made.

Make checks payable to Cultural Center of Cape Cod. Mail submissions to Poetry Competition, Cultural Center of Cape Cod, 307 Old Main St., South Yarmouth, MA 02664

For more information, contact Associate Director Lauren Wolk at lwolk@cultural-center.org

PAST WINNERS:

The Cultural Center would like to thank all who submitted work to the 2016 National and Regional Poetry Competition. There were many excellent poems from which our committee of eight readers could choose only two:

2016 National Winner of the Cultural Center poetry Competition is Angela Patten, of Burlington, Vermont, for Tracks.
2016 Regional Winner is Carole A. Stasiowski of Cotuit, Massachusetts, for Why the Cat Has Not Died.

Finalists:
J. Lorraine Brown of Mashpee, Massachusetts, for Alone on Sage Lot Pond
Michele Herman of New York, New York, for The Human Condition at the CVS
Heidi Seaborn of Seattle, Washington, for Hypothermia Survival Guide
John Surowiecki of Amston, Connecticut, for Little Pink Man

National winner Angela Patten is the author of three poetry collections, In Praise of Usefulness (Wind Ridge Books), Reliquaries and Still Listening (both from Salmon Poetry, Ireland), and a prose memoir, High Tea at a Low Table (Wind Ridge Books). Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, Patten now lives in Burlington, Vermont, where she teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Vermont.

Tracks
By Angela Patten

After surgery the stitch-marks look
like bird-feet walking up my arm.
But what strange bird has left
its bone-white prints embedded
in my wrist like needle-tracks?
Perhaps it was the raven,
that faux-sorrowful funeral director
walking beak-forward, gloved hands
folded behind his back, who walks the
twin trajectories of a railway line
that leads to a long-defunct station
where I might meet myself returning
from the beach with two scabbed knees
embossed inoculations against disease
the weals of ancient injuries like medals
from the battlefields of childhood
and my mother’s crowsfeet
inching toward my eyes.

Kenyon Review’s Summer Reading List

What books are on your summer reading list? Each year, the Kenyon Review asks their staff, editors, and advisory board to share books they recommend or are looking forward to reading themselves. Here are some suggestions for your summer list from the Kenyon Review June 2017 Newsletter.

David Lynn, Editor

Moonglow summer readingTo my mind, Michael Chabon has for years purveyed tales full of wit and astonishment. Yet they have ultimately seemed gossamer, lacking a satisfying or illuminating substance. His latest, however, Moonglow, is a magnificent blend of memoir and fiction about his grandfather. I came away feeling nourished as well as deeply moved.

Mothering Sunday by Graham Swift. Swift made his international reputation early on with Waterland and followed that dazzling performance with other notable fictions, including Last Orders. And yet it seems he’s rarely mentioned in the same breath as other contemporary British or Irish writers of the first rank such as Ian McEwan or Zadie Smith or Colm Tóibín. That should change with Mothering Sunday, a brief, crystalline, potent tour de force. Here is a master of the form playing a contemporary riff on Mrs. Dalloway. I loved it.

KR Reviews!

If these book recommendations aren’t enough for you, be sure to check out the new KR Reviews page on the KR website. New book reviews are posted every Friday.

Continue reading “Kenyon Review’s Summer Reading List”

Akron Poetry Prize

Akron Poetry PrizeUniversity of Akron Press Poetry Prize

Deadline: June 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $25
Prize:  $1,500

Information

The Akron Series in Poetry was founded to bring to the public writers who speak in original and compelling voices. Each year, The University of Akron Press offers the Akron Poetry Prize, a competition open to all poets writing in English. The winning poet receives $1,500 and publication of his, her, or their book. The final selection will be made by a nationally prominent poet. The final judge for 2017 is Oliver de la Paz. Other manuscripts may also be considered for publication in the series.

Guidelines for Submission

1. Manuscripts must be a total length of at least 48 pages and no longer than 90 pages. Individual poems may have appeared in chapbooks or literary magazines, but we are unable to consider collections that have been previously published as a full-length volume. Translations are not eligible.

2. Manuscripts must not include identifying information, but should have a title page, and may include an acknowledgments page listing poems previously published in periodicals (if applicable). Please do not submit manuscripts that have the author’s name on each page, or any biographical information. Manuscripts will go to the judge without identifying information. Be sure that your Submittable account reflects your updated contact information, as we will use this information when contacting you.

3. Manuscripts will be accepted via Submittable between April 15 and June 15 of each year. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but The University of Akron Press must be notified immediately if the manuscript is accepted elsewhere. Multiple submissions are accepted.

4. An entry fee of $25 is required for each manuscript submission, and will be collected through Submittable.

5. Contest results will be posted on our website www.uakron.edu/uapress/poetryprizewinner by September 30. Questions may be sent to uapress@uakron.edu.

6. Intimate friends, relatives, current and former students of the final judge (students in an academic, degree-conferring program or its equivalent), and current faculty, staff, students, and alumni of the University of Akron or the Northeast Ohio MFA Program (NEOMFA) are not eligible to enter the Akron Poetry Prize competition.

2017 Final Judge

Oliver de la Paz is the author of four collections of poetry: Names Above Houses, Furious Lullaby, Requiem for the Orchard, and Post Subject: A Fable. He also co-edited A Face to Meet the Faces: An Anthology of Contemporary Persona Poetry. A founding member, Oliver serves as the co-chair of the Kundiman advisory board. Additionally he serves on the Executive Board of Trustees for the Association of Writers & Writing Programs. His work has been published or is forthcoming in journals such as American Poetry Review, Tin House, The Southern Review, and Poetry Northwest. He teaches at the College of the Holy Cross and in the Low-Residency MFA Program at PLU.

Spokane Prize for Short Fiction


Spokane PrizeWillow Springs Books is pleased to announce the Spokane Prize for Short Fiction!

Willow Springs Books invites submissions for the 2017 Spokane Prize for Short Fiction  until June 5,  2017 .

PRIZE: $2,000 plus publication
OPEN TO: All U.S. authors regardless of publication history
DEADLINE: June 5th, 2017

Submission Guidelines: 

To enter, please submit:

A book-length manuscript. Manuscripts should be no less than 98 pages (with no maximum page count) and include at least 3 short stories. Manuscripts should be organized with page numbers and a table of contents. Stories may have been previously published in journals, anthologies, or limited edition volumes. However, selected story collections (stories previously published in books) will not be considered. Please do not send novels.

A SASE for notification (if submission is by mail)

A cover letter including your name, address, phone number, and email address, as well as a short bio.

A $27.50 reading fee paid through Submittable or via check made out to “Willow Springs Editions” (check or money order only) for each manuscript entry.

♦ Entries must be submitted through Submittable or postmarked by June 5, 2017

Submit online via Submittable:
submit
or send entries by mail to:

Willow Springs Books
c/o Inland Northwest Center for Writers
668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. 2 RPT– #259
Spokane, WA 99202

For questions related to the prize, email willowspringsbooks@gmail.com

Recent Winners Include:

2016 Ventriloquisms by Jaclyn Watterson

2015 Suffering Fools by Glori Simmons
2014 Here Among Strangers by Serena Crawford
2013 All the Wrong Places by Molly Giles
2012 The Empty House Stories by Nathan Oates
2011 You are Not Alone by Sherril Jaffe
2010 Love Songs for the Quarantined by K.L. Cook
2009 Strange Weather by Becky Hagenston
2008 This Is Not Your City by Caitlin Horrocks
2007 Forgetting English by Midge Raymond
2006 The High Heart by Joseph Bathanti
2005 Woman in the Woods by Ann Joslin Williams

Past judges have included Rick Bass, William Kittredge, Jess Walter, John Keeble, Shawn Vestal, and Sharma Shields.

Linda Flowers Literary Award

Linda Flowers Literary AwardPrize: $1,500 & Writers Residency Stipend
Deadline: June 16, 2017
Email: nchc@nchumanities.org
Website: http://www.nchumanities.org/content/linda-flowers-literary-award

Description

The North Carolina Humanities Council invites original, unpublished entries of fiction, nonfiction, or poetry for the Linda Flowers Literary Award. Submissions should detail examinations of intimate, provocative, and inspiring portraiture of North Carolina, its people and cultures, bringing to light real men and women having to make their way in the face of change, loss, triumph, and disappointments.

Guidelines

  • Entries must be deeply and palpably engaged with some aspect of North Carolina, must draw on particular North Carolina connections and/or memories, and profoundly celebrate excellence in the humanities.
  • Authors must be at least 18 years of age and live in North Carolina
  • Entries, regardless of genre, should be original, unpublished works of 3 to 10 pages. Entries that fall outside these length stipulations will be disqualified.
  • All entries should be typed in a standard 12 point font.
    • Prose should be double-spaced.
    • Poetry, whether a suite of poems or one long poem, should be single spaced.
    • If you submit an excerpt from a larger work, include within the 10-page maximum a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole.
  • The author’s name should not appear anywhere on the submis­sion.
  • Only one entry per writer will be accepted.
  • Submissions will only be accepted electronically from March 10, 2017 – June 16, 2017.  Submission instructions and link will be provided at the opening of the cycle.

Submission Instructions

  • Submissions will only be accepted electronically from March 10, 2017 – June 16, 2017
  • Submit original, unpublished work as a Microsoft Word document (the author’s name should not appear anywhere on the submis­sion)
  • Email your submission to lfsubmission@nchumanities.org 
  • Please include the following information in the body of the email:
    • Author’s full name
    • Institutional Affiliation (if any)
    • Telephone number
    • Email address
    • Mailing address
    • Title of the submission(s)

Incomplete submissions and entries that fall outside these guidelines and submission instructions will be disqualified.

Selection Process

A panel of judges will select the Linda Flowers Literary Award winner.

Timeline

Submission deadline:  June 16, 2017

Winner announced: November 3 – 5, 2017 at the North Carolina Writers Network Fall Conference in Wrightsville Beach.

Recipient

The winner of The Linda Flowers Literary Award will receive a cash prize of $1,500 and a stipend for a writer’s residency at Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities in Southern Pines, North Carolina.

About the Award

The North Carolina Humanities Council was privileged to have Linda Flowers as one of our trustees from 1992 to1998. During the years we shared with her, she taught us many things. Above all, Linda showed us what it means to live by one’s belief that “the humanistic apprehension is as necessary for living fully as anything else… [it must ] be recognize[d] and nurture[d]… to realize more fully the potential of the human spirit.”
In addition to honoring Linda Flowers (1944–2000) with an award named for her, the Humanities Council seeks to draw to the attention of others something special that Linda passed on to us. We want to celebrate excellence in the humanities achieved by people like her, those who not only identify with our state, but who explore the promises, the problems, the experiences, the meanings, in lives that have been shaped by North Carolina and its many cultures.

Linda Flowers was somewhat surprised by the strong connections readers made to her book Throwed Away: Failures of Progress in Eastern North Carolina in 1990. She believed they were responses to “the book’s humanistic dimension: the focus on real men and women having to make their way in the face of a changing, onrushing and typically uncaring world.” This is true to the portraits in Throwed Away; it is just as true of “I Have Come Home,” the essay Linda wrote about her experience with cancer for NC Crossroads (May 1999). Both are superb examinations of intimate, provocative, inspiring portraiture of North Carolina, its people and cultures. The Linda Flowers Literary Award is intended for a literary work that demonstrates these powers of recognition.

Previous Linda Flowers Award Recipients:

Please note: No winner was selected for the 2015 Linda Flowers Literary Award.

Ploughshares Emerging Writer’s Contest

Ploughshares Emerging WritersEmerging Writer’s Contest

Since 1971, Ploughshares has been committed to promoting the work of up-and-coming writers. Over the years, Ploughshares has helped launch the careers of great writers like Edward P. Jones, Sue Miller, Mona Simpson, Tim O’Brien, and many more.

In the spirit of the journal’s founding mission, the Ploughshares Emerging Writer’s Contest recognizes work by an emerging writer in each of three genres: fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. One winner in each genre per year will receive $2,000 and publication in the literary journal.  We consider authors “emerging” if they haven’t published or self-published a book.

The Emerging Writer’s Contest is now open. See the full guidelines to submit. The 2017 contest judges are Garth Greenwell (fiction), Meghan Daum (nonfiction), and Natalie Diaz (poetry).

DEADLINE: May 15th NOON EST.

Glimmer Train Short Fiction Contest

SHORT STORY AWARD FOR NEW WRITERS

Adroit Journal Writing Mentorship Program

writing mentorship

writing mentorshipMentor Applications for the 2017 Adroit Journal Summer Writing Mentorship Program — Now Open!

The Adroit Journal Summer Mentorship Program is an entirely free, entirely online summer program that seeks to pair high school writers from around the world with established writers in poetry, fiction, or nonfiction.

The ideal mentor is organized, is knowledgeable about either contemporary poetry, fiction, or nonfiction, has experience in the classroom with creative writing (whether as a student, a teacher, or both), and anticipates being reachable for the duration of the program (late June to early August).

Mentors may create an original syllabus, use a provided syllabus model, or may use an outside syllabus. The application to mentor includes a statement of interest, writing sample, and curriculum vitae.

We are accepting applications on a rolling basis, so the sooner we receive your application, the better!

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Mentoring reminded me that what’s most important is getting students—and ourselves!—to generate, to write our truths fearlessly and bravely.
— Raena Shirali, 2016 Mentor

Glimmer Train Short Story Award for New Writers Winter Deadline

SHORT STORY AWARD FOR NEW WRITERS

Crazyhorse Literary Prizes

crazyhorse literary prizesCrazyhorse Literary Prizes

Entry Fee: $20
Website: http://crazyhorse.cofc.edu

Crazyhorse Literary Prizes offer three awards of $2,000 each and publication in Crazyhorse. Prizes are given annually for a poem, a short story, and an essay. Ada Limón will judge in poetry, Justin Torres will judge in fiction, and Robin Hemley will judge in nonfiction. Using the online submission system, submit up to three poems or a story or essay of up to 25 pages with a $20 entry fee, which includes a subscription to Crazyhorse, during the month of January. All entries are considered for publication. Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Crazyhorse, Literary Prizes, College of Charleston, English Department, 66 George Street, Charleston, SC 29424.

Deadline: January 31, 2017

Davidson Fellows Scholarship Awards

DAVIDSON FELLOWS

Davidson FellowsThe Davidson Fellows Scholarship awards extraordinary young people, 18 and under, who have completed a significant piece of work. Davidson Fellows named as one of “The 10 Biggest Scholarships in the World” by TheBestColleges.org and one of “7 Prestigious Undergrad Scholarships” in U.S. News & World Report.

CATEGORIES: Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, Literature, Music, Philosophy and Outside the Box.

AWARD:

  • Scholarship awards $50,000, $25,000 and $10,000
  • Fellows are honored in Washington, D.C. with Congressional meetings and a special reception.

HOW TO APPLY: Visit: http://www.davidsongifted.org/Fellows-Scholarship  to review category requirements. Questions? Email DavidsonFellows@DavidsonGifted.org.

Deadline: February 8, 2017

Summer Writing Programs for Teens

Summer Writing Program             Application Deadlines

Summer Writing Programs
Student reading at Kenyon Young Writers Workshop, Summer 2016

Summer writing programs are a great way to hone your skills, meet other writers, and give yourself permission to be creative.  For links and details about the programs, click on “Summer Programs” on the menu bar above.

DEADLINES:

Bard College at Simon’s Rock Workshop: Rolling
Champlain College Young Writers Workshop: 2/24
Emerson College Writing Workshop: 5/22
Iowa Young Writers Studio: 2/8
Juniper Institute for Young Writers: 3/1 (priority)
Kenyon College Young Writers Workshop: 3/1
Putney Summer School Program: Rolling
Sewanee Young Writers Conference: Rolling
Susquehanna University Writers Workshop: 4/1

NOTE:
• Some applications require writing samples and teacher recommendations.
• Links to many additional programs available on the “Summer Programs” tab.

The Theater Project NJ Young Playwrights Competition

Theater Project Young Playwrights  Contest 

Theater Project Young Playwrights ContestWebsite: The Theater Project; Deadline: January 20, 2017

For high school students
aged 13 – 18  

Key Dates

  • Scripts due January 2017
  • Finalists notified February 2017
  • Awards ceremony March  2017

The purpose of this playwriting competition is to encourage New Jersey high school students to write and also advance their interest in theater.    

High school students aged 13-18 are invited to submit either a short play or an excerpt from a longer work that they have written.  Winners’ plays will be performed by professional actors.

The prize winners will receive cash awards and see their work performed by the professional actors of The Theater Project at a ceremony. Additional writers will be presented with honorable mention citations and gift certificates.

In addition to the award ceremony, The Theater Project is providing free tutorials for any interested entrant in this year’s competition. Each young author has been offered a half hour script consultation with one of the adult playwrights and directors from the Theater Project. They will pass along their experiences with theater in general and discuss the challenges of playwriting.

Young writers will also have the chance to meet with other contestants and the actors who are performing that day.

Deadlines for 2017 submissions will be posted here November 2016.


Submission
​Guidelines

To enter
the competition

  • Entrants must attend a NJ high school  
  • Scripts must be between 10 and 30 pages
  • Scripts must be in play format
  • Original work only, no adaptations
  • One entry per author
1. Fill out entry form
2.Upload script, author bio and photo
3. Pay $10 entry fee by card or check

Writing Conference Inc. Contest

Writing Conference ContestA Kansas nonprofit established in 1980, the Writing Conference Inc. hosts an annual national writing contest for middle and high school students.

WHO: Students in grades 6 -12

WHAT TO SUBMIT: Each student may submit ONE entry: a poem, exposition (personal essay) or narration (short story or play).

2017 THEME: CHANGE: Change is found in almost every place – school, church, government, etc…  Or is it?  Some say change isn’t occurring at all or at least not fast enough. When change does occur, it may be planned or spontaneous. Create a  poem, narrative, or essay in which you incorporate your ideas and feelings concerning change.

ENTRY FORM: Required form found here.

PRIZE: Award winning pieces will be published in The Writers’ Slate whose audience is comprised of students and teachers at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels. Submissions should be appropriate for this audience.

SUBMISSION: Student’s name must NOT appear on the manuscript, only on the entry form. Mail manuscripts and entry forms to:

                The Writing Conference, Inc.
PO Box 664
Ottawa, Kansas
66067-0664

DEADLINE: Sunday, January 8, 2017

New Jersey Young Playwrights Contest

NJ Young Playwrights Contest

New Jersey Young Playwrights ContestWHAT: The Writers Theatre of New Jersey invites middle and high school students in grades 4-12 to submit plays to the New Jersey Young Playwrights Contest.

WHO: NJ students in grades 4 -12

LENGTH: up to 20 pages

TYPE OF PLAY: The contest seeks plays with “realistic” structures, but also encourages non-traditional and inventive work. Judges look for strong plot, characterization, dialogue, conflict, theme, and originality.

THEMES: Plays may be on any topic, but there is a special category, “Living with Disabilities” designed for plays either written by an author with a disability, or a play with themes or characters dealing with disabilities.

FORMATTING: Formatting instructions may be found under the Submissions Guidelines tab.

PRIZE: Winning plays will be performed by professional actors at the NJ Young Playwrights Festival in June.

DETAILS & SUBMISSION: Find links on the Creative Writing News or email Ms. James at tjames@newarka.edu

Deadline: Extended to January 15, 2017

Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

How do I enter work in the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards?
Scholastic Writing

Sign Up!

The 2017 Scholastic Awards are open to students in grades 7 – 12. The writing and art deadlines vary according to region. Many fall in mid-December.  You can participate in the 2017 Scholastic Awards by creating an account and uploading your work .

Create!

The Scholastic Awards look for work that demonstrates originality, technical skill, and emergence of a personal voice or vision. After you have created your work, uploaded it to your Scholastic Awards Account! Visit our online galleries to see examples of works from past National Medalists. Be sure to visit our copyright and plagiarism FAQ to learn more about submitting original works.

Stamp It and Send It!

After uploading your work, print your submission forms, have a parent/guardian and an educator sign them, and then mail them to the Affiliate Partner in your local region. Mailing instructions can be found on the submission form or on your local Affiliate’s Website.

What else do I need to know?

Eligibility

Public, private, or home-school students in the U.S., Canada, or American schools abroad enrolled in grades 7–12 are eligible to participate in the Scholastic Awards.

Category Descriptions: For a full list of category descriptions, click HERE.

Blind Judging:  The Scholastic Awards are adjudicated without knowledge of the artists/writers identity. Please make sure that your submission does not contain any personal information.

Freedom of Expression: Young artists and writers are free to explore any and all topics. There are no pre-defined prompts and no work is ever disqualified from the Scholastic Awards because of the nature of its content.

Judging Criteria

Originality: Work that breaks from convention, blurs the boundaries between genres, and challenges notions of how a particular concept or emotion can be expressed.

Technical Skill: Work that uses technique to advance an original perspective or a personal vision or voice, and show skills being utilized to create something unique, powerful, and innovative.

Emergence of a Personal Vision or Voice: Work with an authentic and unique point of view and style.

NJCTE High School Writing Contest

NJCTE High School WritingNJCTE High School Writing Contest invites New Jersey students in grades 9-12 to submit ONE entry in each category:

  • Poetry (one poem, 50-line max.) –FREE CHOICE (no theme)
  • Short story (5-page max. double-spaced) – FREE CHOICE (no theme)
  • Personal essay* (5-page max., double-spaced) – RESPOND TO PROMPT BELOW

See website for details.  Click here to register for the contest.

Have the following items ready to submit:

  1. Your sponsoring teacher’s name – Make sure to ask the teacher’s permission to use his/her name since each teacher can only sponsor 10 students per genre.
  2. Your teacher’s email address
  3. Your poem, short story or essay in pdf or MS Word format – The name of the file must match your title.
  4.  Make sure your name and personal information do NOT appear on the document you are submitting.
  5. Please refer to the writing contest flyer for length limitations.

2017 Personal Essay Writing Prompt — STICKS and STONES:

“Sometimes one or two words have a tremendous impact.  This may be true of words we have uttered or words that have been spoken or written to us.  We may have observed someone close to us afflicted or strengthened by words directed at them.  Write about a time when a word or a set of words had a powerful effect. (See, for example, Countee Cullen’s  “Incident”.) Did this word/these words have a long-term effect on your life or the life of someone close to you?  If the words inflicted pain, how and why? Did an insult ever make you stronger? Did a word haunt you for days or weeks later?  Did a word of praise ever come to your rescue?  Were you motivated to act decisively or change your ways by something someone said to you?  Bring readers into your story and help them think about the power of words.  Make us understand your thoughts, feel your pain, or share your joy.”

How to enter:

  1. Visit our web-site at njcte.com and follow the instructions provided. You must be a New Jersey high school student to enter.
    2017 NJCTE HS Writing Contest Flyer.doc
    Microsoft Word Document 40.0 KB

    You must complete a registration form for each genre you plan to submit.

Tips to Avoid Disqualification:

  1. The file submitted must be anonymous. Files with student name, school or class on them will be disqualified.
  2. Each student may submit a maximum of one entry in each category (i.e. only one poem, one short story and one essay).
  3. Each teacher may submit up to ten entries for their students in each genre. Surplus entries will be disqualified in order of submission date.

Awards:

  • Genre Winners (poetry, short story, personal essay): Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals.
    • Gold medalists are eligible for the Governor’s Awards in Arts Education (GAAE).
    • Gold, silver, and bronze poets read at the Dodge Poetry Festival in 2014 and 2016.
  • School/District Winners:
    • Honorable Mention: Top scoring students
      • From schools with qualifying entries from at least 10 different students sponsored by at least three different teachers
    • Certificates of Merit – Top scoring students
      • From schools which submit qualifying entries from at least three different students.

DEADLINE: December 16, 2016. Questions: njctewritingcontest@outlook.com.

Poetry Society of America Student Award

Student Poetry AwardLouise Louis / Emily F. Bourne Student Poetry Award, $250

Endowed under the wills of Louise Louis Whitbread and Ruth M. Bourne, this prize is awarded for the best unpublished poem by a student in grades 9 through 12 from the United States. Teachers or administrators may submit an unlimited number of their students’ poems, one submission per student.

 Submission Details & Instructions

•  You can only  submit one entry per student.
•  A poem that has previously won a PSA Award cannot be re-submitted.
•  No previously published work can be submitted.
•  Translations are ineligible.
•  Poems by more than one author will not be accepted.
•  Entry should have one cover page and two collated copies of your poem.

The Cover Page must include:

Name
Address
Email (if available)
Phone
Name of the Award
Title and First Line of first poem in submission
Your name should not appear anywhere else besides this cover sheet.

Cover Sheet Template: It’s not a requirement, but you might find it helpful to use our cover sheet template.

Entry Fee

High school students may send single entries to the Louise Louis/Emily F. Bourne Student Poetry Award for the fee of $5.

High school teachers or administrators may submit an unlimited number of their students’ poems (one submission per student) for a $20 entry fee.

You do not need to be a member of the Poetry Society of America to submit to this award.

Checks should be made payable to the Poetry Society of America.

Mailing Address

Poetry Society of America
Annual Award Submission
15 Gramercy Park
New York, NY 10003

DEADLINE: December 22, 2016